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Suitcase Sefton and the American Dream
Suitcase Sefton and the American Dream

Suitcase Sefton and the American Dream

By Jay Feldman

FICTION

240 Pages, 6 x 9

Formats: Cloth, Mobipocket, PDF, EPUB

Cloth, $22.95 (US $22.95) (CA $25.95)

ISBN 9781572438125

Rights: WOR

Triumph Books (Apr 2006)

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Overview

Roving the lonesome highways in search of fresh baseball talent in 1942, New York Yankees scout Mac "Suitcase" Sefton discovers a once-in-a-lifetime talent in Jerry Yamada. The young left-handed pitcher seems poised to take his place among the pantheon of major league pitching greats. However, he's being held indefinitely in a Japanese American internment camp, and he's not even certain that he wants to play professional baseball. Caught behind barbed wire in a camp in Arizona, Jerry, his lovely sister, Annie, and their old-world parents make the best of their confinement while Sefton schemes to find a way to free Yamada and convince him to play for the Yanks. Sefton's interest in Yamada and his family changes from professional to personal when he accepts an offer to join the Yamadas for tea in their primitive quarters in a converted army barrack. Sefton's respect for their strength and the values they hold dear develops and deepens as he begins to see how his own lifestyle contrasts with the Yamadas’. A profound change takes place in him as he discusses freedom and the future with Annie. As a result, the relationships between the scout and the Japanese American family strain and strengthen as they share their cultures and lives. Amid baseball, racism, and hope, Sefton and the Yamadas rediscover the American dream.

Author Biography

Jay Feldman is a widely published writer. His articles have appeared in Smithsonian, Newsweek, Sports Illustrated, The New York Times, Gourmet, Whole Earth Review, and a broad variety of other national, regional and local publications. A number of his pieces have been anthologized. He has also written for television (the highly acclaimed but short-lived CBS series Brooklyn Bridge), film, and the stage, A Loud Noise in a Public Place.

Press Releases

Baseball is a universal language. It\'s a ball, a bat and a mitt. It\'s a game of skill that transcends boundaries. A brand-new novel by Jay Feldman reveals how baseball can act as a source of normalcy during some of the most difficult and lonely times while also bringing the necessary continuity to an otherwise messy situation.

 

In Suitcase Sefton and the American Dream Feldman tells a story about Mac “Suitcase” Sefton, a scout for the New York Yankees who discovers the meaning of family and love, and a cannon-armed lefty at a Japanese-American internment camp in during World War II in1942.

 

As Sefton schemes to get the pitcher – Jerry Yamada – released from the camp, he is forced to confront his own conceptions of race, culture, and politics. Sefton’s contact with Yamada, his family – including Yamada’s sister Annie, with whom the scout falls in love – and the rest of the camp internees inevitably lead to a culture clash, which causes Sefton to confront his own life and values. Through the filter of baseball, Suitcase Sefton addresses issues of personal integrity, racism, internment, and American dreams.

 

Combining fictional characters and historic personages, Suitcase Sefton and the American Dream is well-grounded by extensive historical research, which grew out of a long article Feldman wrote on baseball in the internment camps. The original article, “Baseball Behind Barbed Wire,” can be seen at his website www.jfeldman.com.  

 

Baseball fans will have the opportunity to look at baseball from a fresh perspective. It’s so much more than just a game and Suitcase Sefton and the American Dream gives readers something to think about for years to come.

 

About the Authors

Jay Feldman is a widely published writer. His articles have appeared in Smithsonian, Newsweek, Sports Illustrated, The New York Times, Gourmet, Whole Earth Review, and a broad variety of other national, regional and local publications. A number of his pieces have been anthologized. He has also written for television (the highly acclaimed but short-lived CBS series Brooklyn Bridge), film, and the stage A Loud Noise in a Public Place.